Ringette

01 Overview

Ringette is a team sport where players use sticks to maneuver a blue ring on the ice. Gym ringette is the indoor floor version of ringette. Originating in Canada, the sport is governed locally by Ringette BC, and is more popular among females than males. Unlike ice hockey, ringette does not allow intentional body checking at any level. Common injuries in ringette include concussions, and injuries to the upper and lower extremities.

(see Section 04 - Prevention)
Athlete silhouette
View Common Injuries by clicking the blue dots on the silhouette

Concussions are a common injury suffered by ringette players.

The upper extremities are common areas of injury in ringette players.

The lower extremities are common areas of injury in ringette players.

02 Injury Statistics

The information below is based on data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP), mostly among young females (up to 17 years of age).

Ringette has the lowest number of Canadian children up to 17 years of age presenting to emergency departments participating in CHIRPP for sports-related injuries. The most common injuries in ringette include soft tissue injury, head injury, sprains and strains, and fractures.

Curious about the research on injuries?

It is estimated that...

03 Risk Factors

  • Body Contact

    Although body checking is not allowed in ringette, over half of ringette injuries are caused by body contact (both intentional and unintentional). Body contact is more likely to be the cause of injury among older age groups as compared to younger age groups.

  • Playing Stick

    Contact with the playing stick can result in injuries to the upper extremities, specifically soft tissue and minor injuries.

04 How can I prevent injury?

Some muscle soreness or joint pain is expected when increasing your level of physical activity. It is important to listen to your body for persistent or worsening pain, and to know when to rest. Learn more about how to prevent injuries in ringette.

  • Participant & Parent

    Talk to your coach or organization about the prevention strategies below and how they might be incorporated into training and policies.

    Education

    Proper skills training can help reduce your risk of injury in ringette.

    Equipment

    Use of proper protective equipment can prevent against injuries in ringette. Mouthguards are recommended for use during play.

    Managing Concussion

    Concussions are a common injury in ringette, so it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) an online resource for players and parents to learn more about how to recognize, prevent, and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to respond to a potential concussion situation, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by regular participation in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component, such as a neuromuscular training warm-up program.

    Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    The Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre has developed a neuromuscular training warm-up program that can be adapted to many sports. Incorporating a warm-up program like this one into your training program at least two times per week has been associated with a significant reduction in lower body injuries.

    Click here to view video and poster.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the lower extremities. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed exercises that specifically help keep the legs strong and reduce the risk of hamstring and knee injuries. This resource includes videos and PDFs for download.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent hamstring injuries.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent knee injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Ringette Resources
    Ringette BC equipment standards requires that youth wear regulation shoulder pads. Mouthguards are recommended for use during play.

    Ringette Canada provides information on:

    Sport-related Physicals
    Ringette can be a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. A sport-related physical evaluation at the beginning of each season ensuring fitness to play can help to reduce risk of injury. KidsHealth provides information about what sports physicals are, why they may be appropriate and where you may go to get them.

    Learn more about Kids Health Sports Physicals.

  • Coach & Teacher

    Talk to your organization or school about the prevention strategies below and how they might be incorporated into training and policies.

    Certification for Coaches

    Enforcement of policies regarding body contact can reduce the risk of injury in ringette. Ensure you are up-to-date on the latest rules and policies in your local ringette league.

    Managing Concussion

    Concussions are a common injury in ringette, so it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource for coaches and teachers to learn more about how to recognize, prevent, and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to respond to a potential concussion situation, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Equipment

    Use of proper protective equipment can prevent against injuries in ringette. Mouthguards are recommended for use during play.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by regular participation in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component, such as a neuromuscular training warm-up program.

    Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    The Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre has developed a neuromuscular training warm-up program that can be adapted to many sports. Incorporating a warm-up program like this one into your training program at least two times per week has been associated with a significant reduction in lower body injuries.

    Click here to view video and poster.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the lower extremities. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed exercises that specifically help keep the legs strong and reduce the risk of hamstring and knee injuries. This resource includes videos and PDFs for download.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent hamstring injuries.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent knee injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Gym Ringette
    Teachers can implement gym ringette into their physical education curriculums.

    Ringette Canada has a Teacher’s Guide for Gym Ringette; and Move Think Learn, Ringette in Focus. This series of activities is easy to implement and is targeted to children in Grades 4 through 9.

    The Ontario Physical Education Association (OPHEA) provides recommendations for safely implementing gym ringette in secondary schools.

    Learn more about implementing gym ringette.

    Ringette Resources
    Ringette BC has information on

    Ringette Canada provides information on:

    Sport-related Physicals
    Ringette can be a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. A sport-related physical evaluation at the beginning of each season ensuring fitness to play can help to reduce risk of injury. KidsHealth provides information about what sports physicals are, why they may be appropriate and where you may go to get them.

    Learn more about Kids Health Sports Physicals.

  • Official & Administrator

    Talk to your coaches, teachers, organization, or school about the prevention strategies below and how they might be incorporated into training and policies.

    Officiating Ringette

    Enforcement of policies regarding body contact can reduce the risk of injury in ringette. Ensure you are up-to-date on the latest rules and policies in your local ringette league. Proper maintenance of ice conditions prior to the start of the game can reduce risk of injury.

    Managing Concussion

    Concussions are a common injury in ringette, so it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource to learn more about how to recognize, prevent, and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to respond to a potential concussion situation, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Ringette Canada has a concussion policy and concussion management guidelines.

    Equipment

    Use of proper protective equipment can prevent against injuries in ringette.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by regular participation in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component, such as a neuromuscular training warm-up program.

    Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    The Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre has developed a neuromuscular training warm-up program that can be adapted to many sports. Incorporating a warm-up program like this one into the coach’s training program at least two times per week has been associated with a significant reduction in lower body injuries.

    Click here to view video and poster.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the lower extremities. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed exercises that specifically help keep the legs strong and reduce the risk of hamstring and knee injuries. This resource includes videos and PDFs for download.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent hamstring injuries.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent knee injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Ringette Resources
    Ringette BC has information on

    Ringette Canada provides information on:

    Gym Ringette
    Teachers can implement gym ringette into their physical education curriculums.

    Ringette Canada has a Teacher’s Guide for Gym Ringette; and Move Think Learn, Ringette in Focus. This series of activities is easy to implement and is targeted to children in Grades 4 through 9.

    The Ontario Physical Education Association (OPHEA) provides recommendations for safely implementing gym ringette in secondary schools.

    Learn more about implementing gym ringette.

    Sport-related Physicals
    Ringette can be a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. A sport-related physical evaluation at the beginning of each season ensuring fitness to play can help to reduce risk of injury. KidsHealth provides information about what sports physicals are, why they may be appropriate and where you may go to get them.

    Learn more about Kids Health Sports Physicals.

  • Health Professional

    The role of health professionals in preventing ringette injuries has two main components:

    1. Providing ongoing education to players, parents, and coaches on effective injury prevention programs such as balance and resistance training; and
    2. Ensuring that injured players are completely healed and fit-to-perform before returning to ringette to prevent re-injury or chronic injury.

    Managing Concussion

    Concussions are a common injury in ringette, so it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource to learn more about how to diagnose and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to assess a potential concussion, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Education

    Use of proper protective equipment and enforcement of policies regarding body contact can prevent against injuries in ringette. Encourage players, parents, teachers, and coaches to educate themselves on the latest rules and equipment standards.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by regular participation in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component, such as a neuromuscular training warm-up program.

    Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    The Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre has developed a neuromuscular training warm-up program that can be adapted to many sports. Incorporating a warm-up program like this one into your training program at least two times per week has been associated with a significant reduction in lower body injuries.

    Click here to view video and poster.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the lower extremities. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed exercises that specifically help keep the legs strong and reduce the risk of hamstring and knee injuries. This resource includes videos and PDFs for download.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent hamstring injuries.

    Learn more about exercises to help prevent knee injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Sport-related Physicals
    Ringette can be a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. An annual sport-related physical evaluation ensuring fitness to participate can help to reduce risk of injury. The American Academy of Pediatrics provides information about preparticipation physical evaluation.

    Learn more about Preparticipation Physical Evaluation.

    Ringette Resources
    Ringette BC equipment standards requires that youth wear regulation shoulder pads.

    Ringette Canada provides information on: