Trampoline

01 Overview

Trampolining is enjoyed by people of all ages. Participants bounce on a trampoline and sometimes perform stunts, such as twists and somersaults. Trampolining has recently gained popularity, having been a part of the Summer Olympics since 2000, with trampolines becoming common in backyards and the opening of indoor trampoline parks. Common injuries include fractures, sprains, and other soft tissue injuries to the ankle, elbow, head, and spine.

(see Section 04 - Prevention)
Athlete silhouette
View Common Injuries by clicking the blue dots on the silhouette

Ankle injuries are common in trampolining, including sprains, strains, and fractures.

Shoulder injuries are common in trampolining, often resulting from falling off the trampoline.

Injuries to the back and spine are common in trampolining, occurring most often from awkward landings on the trampoline.

While not as common as other injuries, injuries to the head, including concussions, can occur.

02 Injury Statistics

There is a lack of information on injury patterns and rates in structured training or competitive trampoline events; the following information is mainly related to recreational trampoline use.

 Trampoline injuries affect people of all ages. In Canada, despite occurring less frequently than other sport- and recreation-related injuries, a relatively high proportion of trampoline injuries result in hospitalization. According to data from the Canadian Hospital Injury Reporting and Prevention Program, there was a 56% increase in hospital admissions as a result of trampoline-related injuries between 1990 and 2001 among children and youth.

Trampolines are not recommended for children under 6 years of age; however, this age group accounts for 22% to 37% of trampoline-related injuries. Fractures are more common when falling off the trampoline, and spinal injuries are more common when on the trampoline. Common injuries among adults are to the lower limbs and spine.

Curious about the research on injuries?

It is estimated that...

03 Risk Factors

Risk factors in trampolining include age, more than one person on the trampoline at a time, quality of the equipment, lack of supervision, and attempting stunts on the trampoline.

  • Age

    Children are more likely to be injured while trampolining compared to older adolescents and adults. Children 5-years-old and younger are at higher risk of fractures.

  • Multiple People on the Trampoline

    Having more than one person on a trampoline at a time increases the risk of injury.

  • Performing Stunts

    Attempting stunts such as somersaults or backflips increases the risk of head and cervical spine injury.

  • Lack of Supervision

    Most injuries occur among children when there is no adult present.

  • Quality of Equipment

    Having a low-quality or worn trampoline and frame can increase the risk of injury.

04 How can I prevent injury?

  • Participant & Parent

    Talk to your coach or organization, if applicable, about the prevention strategies below and how they might be incorporated into training and policies.

    Recommendations

    The Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that backyard trampolines should not be used as a recreational activity for children and youth.

    Health Canada, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission recommend that children younger than six-years-old should not use trampolines.

    Supervision

    Adult supervision can reduce the risk of injury in children on the trampoline; however, in one-third of cases, children were injured despite having parent supervision.

    Managing Concussion

    While concussions are not the most common injury in trampolining, it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource for participants and parents to learn more about how to recognize, prevent, and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to respond to a potential concussion situation, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the back and ankle. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed specific exercises in video and PDF form to help prevent injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Equipment
    Trampoline equipment should meet safety standards and be inspected regularly. Padding should cover the frame, hooks, springs, and supporting bars. The surface surrounding the trampoline should have mats; an outdoor trampoline should be surrounded with netting. Warning labels are recommended to note the maximum number of jumpers (which is 1) and the dangers of attempting stunts. 

    Training
    Learn proper form and technique to reduce the risk of injury. Proper technique can decrease the potential for imbalances that can lead to chronic issues. Always practice in the presence of a spotter.

    Sport-related Physicals
    Competitive trampolining is a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. An annual sport-related physical evaluation ensuring fitness to participate can help to reduce risk of injury. KidsHealth provides information about what sports physicals are, why they may be appropriate and where you may go to get them.

    Learn more about Kids Health Sports Physicals.

  • Coach & Teacher

    Talk to your organization or school, if applicable, about the prevention strategies below and how they might be incorporated into training and policies.

    Recommendations

    The Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that backyard trampolines should not be used as a recreational activity for children and youth.

    Health Canada, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission recommend that children younger than six-years-old should not use trampolines.

    Supervision

    Adult supervision can reduce the risk of injury in children on the trampoline; however, in one-third of cases, children were injured despite having parent supervision.

    Managing Concussion

    While concussions are not the most common injury in trampolining, it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource for coaches and teachers to learn more about how to recognize, prevent, and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to respond to a potential concussion situation, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program
    The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by regular participation in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the back and ankle. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed specific exercises in video and PDF form to help prevent injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Equipment
    Trampoline equipment should meet safety standards and be inspected regularly. Padding should cover the frame, hooks, springs, and supporting bars. The surface surrounding the trampoline should have mats; an outdoor trampoline should be surrounded with netting. Warning labels are recommended to note the maximum number of jumpers (which is 1) and the dangers of attempting stunts.

    Training
    Coaching on proper form and technique can reduce the risk of injury among your participants. Proper technique can decrease the potential for imbalances that can lead to chronic issues. Participants should practice in the presence of a spotter.

    Facilities
    The Ontario Physical Education Association (OPHEA) provides recommendations for safety in trampoline activity in schools.

    Learn more about above-ground trampolining in secondary schools and in-ground trampolining in elementary schools.

    Sport-related Physicals
    Competitive trampolining is a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. An annual sport-related physical evaluation ensuring fitness to participate can help to reduce risk of injury. KidsHealth provides information about what sports physicals are, why they may be appropriate and where you may go to get them.

    Learn more about Kids Health Sports Physicals.

  • Official & Administrator

    Talk to your coaches, teachers, organization, or school about the prevention strategies below and how they might be incorporated into training and policies.

    Recommendations

    The Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that backyard trampolines should not be used as a recreational activity for children and youth.

    Health Canada, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission recommend that children younger than six-years-old should not use trampolines.

    Supervision

    Adult supervision can reduce the risk of injury in children on the trampoline; however, in one-third of cases, children were injured despite having parent supervision.

    Managing Concussion

    While concussions are not the most common injury in trampolining, it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource to learn more about how to recognize, prevent, and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to respond to a potential concussion situation, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by regular participation in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the back and ankle. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed specific exercises in video and PDF form to help prevent injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Equipment
    Trampoline equipment should meet safety standards and be inspected regularly. Padding should cover the frame, hooks, springs, and supporting bars. The surface surrounding the trampoline should have mats; an outdoor trampoline should be surrounded with netting. Warning labels are recommended to note the maximum number of jumpers (which is 1) and the dangers of attempting stunts.

    Facilities
    The Ontario Physical Education Association (OPHEA) provides recommendations for safety in trampoline activity in schools.

    Learn more about above-ground trampolining in secondary schools and in-ground trampolining in elementary schools.

    Training
    Coaching on proper form and technique can reduce the risk of injury in your participants. Proper technique can decrease the potential for imbalances that can lead to chronic issues. Participants should practice in the presence of a spotter.

    Sport-related Physicals
    Competitive trampolining is a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. An annual sport-related physical evaluation ensuring fitness to participate can help to reduce risk of injury. KidsHealth provides information about what sports physicals are, why they may be appropriate and where you may go to get them.

    Learn more about Kids Health Sports Physicals.

  • Health Professional

    The role of health professionals in preventing trampoline injuries has two main components:

    1. Providing ongoing education to participants, parents, and coaches on effective injury prevention programs such as balance and resistance training; and
    2. Ensuring that injured participants are completely healed and fit-to-perform before returning to activity to prevent re-injury or chronic injury.

    Recommendations

    The Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that backyard trampolines should not be used as a recreational activity for children and youth.

    Health Canada, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission recommend that children younger than six-years-old should not use trampolines.

    Supervision

    Adult supervision can reduce the risk of injury among children on the trampoline; however, in one-third of cases, children were injured despite having parent supervision.

    Managing Concussion

    While concussions are not the most common injury in trampolining, it is important to be aware of concussion signs and symptoms and know what to do if concussion is suspected. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is an online resource to learn more about how to diagnose and manage a concussion. CATT also includes resources on how to assess a potential concussion, as well as detailed Return to School and Return to Sport protocol.

    Strength Training and Neuromuscular Training Program

    Encourage athletes engaging in competitive trampolining to participate in a balance training exercise program with a resistance training component. The risk of all lower body injuries may be reduced by up to 50% by adopting this program.

    Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre Neuromuscular Training
    Adopt strength training exercises designed to prevent injuries to the back and ankle. The Oslo Sport Trauma Research Centre has developed specific exercises in video and PDF form to help prevent injuries.

    For more exercises, visit http://fittoplay.org/.

    Other Considerations (about this section)

    Sport-related Physicals
    Competitive trampolining is a physically demanding sport and some pre-existing conditions may increase the risk of injury. An annual sport-related physical evaluation ensuring fitness to participate can help to reduce risk of injury. The American Academy of Pediatrics provides information about preparticipation physical evaluation.

    Learn more about Preparticipation Physical Evaluation

    Equipment
    Encourage parents, teachers, and participants to check that their trampoline equipment meets safety standards and is inspected regularly. Padding should cover the frame, hooks, springs, and supporting bars. The surface surrounding the trampoline should have mats; an outdoor trampoline should be surrounded with netting. Warning labels are recommended to note the maximum number of jumpers (which is 1) and the dangers of attempting stunts.

    Training
    Encourage coaching on proper form and technique to reduce the risk of injury. Proper technique can decrease the potential for imbalances that can lead to chronic issues. Participants should practice in the presence of a spotter.